We Need A Ramadan

18 08 2008

Ramadan, Fasting, Islam,

Benefits of Ramadhaan (we need Ramadhaan)

by Abu Uwais Abdullah Alee [Listen to Audio ]

Transcribed by: Umm Hasna Firdous Bint Jabir

TRANSCRIPTION:

Ramadhaan is a month of Forgiveness.

Ramadhaan is a month of Rahmah.

Ramadhaan is the month of generosity.

Ramadhaan, the month that Allaah subhaanahu wa ta’ala accepts the Tawbah of the servants, and the month that Allaah blesses His servants.

We are in need of Ramadhaan to correct ourselves, for we have forgotten Allaah tabarak wa ta’ala for the majority of the year.

To correct ourselves for we have been neglectful.

To correct ourselves for we are not upon the remembrance of Allaah.

To correct ourselves because our hearts have gotten hard, some hearts are dead, some hearts are sick, some hearts are stone-cold, some hearts are black, getting no benefit whatsoever. Some hearts are so bad, and so ill that they see a good as a Munkar, (as an evil), and they see an evil as a good. These are not as they should be.

We need a Ramadhaan. We need a Ramadhaan because our connection with Allaah tabarak wa ta’ala is not correct.

We need a Ramadhaan because we do not have any Khushoo or devotion in our Salaah.

We need a Ramadhaan because our Qura’an has dust and is sitting o­n a shelf.

We need a Ramadhaan because we never read the books of Sunnah.

We need a Ramadhaan because we don’t fast, and if we fast physically without food or drink, we don’t fast with our eyes by lowering them and our tongue by not slandering and our tongue by not lying and back-biting. We need a Ramadhaan to get ourselves back in order, to work for the Hereafter, to connect ourselves to Allaah tabarak wa ta’ala.

We need a Ramadhaan because relationships brother to brother and sister to sister is in a miserable condition.

We need a Ramadhaan because we have bad thoughts about o­ne another.

We need a Ramadhaan because of dhulm, injustice to o­ne another.

We need a Ramadhaan because there is backbiting, there is envy, there is jealousy, and there is slander.

We need a Ramadhaan because we are despicable, because we are sick, because we are  ill. (All these are diseases of the heart)

We need a Ramadhaan because we don’t believe in the promise of Allaah tabarak wa ta’ala, or if we do, we do not  implement it.

We need a Ramadhaan because it is time for us to change and become something better then we are now.

We need a Ramadhaan because that is  the o­nly thing that is  going to get us together…

We need a Ramadhaan because we don’t have unity, there’s no brotherhood

We need a Ramadhaan because there’s no respect for elders

We need a Ramadhaan because there’s no real love between us

We need a Ramadhaan, full of love and the Mercy of Allaah tabarak wa ta’ala.

A Ramadhaan like we come in, like in a clinic or a hospital, trying to solve our illnesses, trying to come out of there without the disease we came with, trying to be better than we went in with.

We need a Ramadhaan. Look around you, look to your right, look to your left, look in front of you and look behind you and you’ll say,  “We need a Ramadhaan”.

The sisters aren’t covering properly, we need a Ramadhaan. Brothers and sisters are mixing. We need a Ramadhaan. Talking o­n phones and o­n the internet, we need a Ramadhaan. This is a mess, we are in a fix, we are in a bind, and this is a problem… We need a Ramadhaan. We need a Ramadhaan to get ourselves together.

We need a Ramadhaan, that we come in the Masjid and we face the Qiblah and we say “Allaahu Akbar” and we stand in qiyaamah a long time until those diseases, that filth, that sickness, that hardness  the heart goes away.

We need a Ramadhaan that reminds us of the Hell-fire. We need a Ramadhaan that tells us that we haven’t been given a certificate that we are people of Jannah.

We need a Ramadhaan that lets us known that we are servants of Allaah tabarak wa ta’ala.

And if we were to spend our whole life, from the time we were born until Yawm al Qiyaamah in Sajdaah, it would not be enough to thank Allaah for His Mercy, His Grace and His Blessings.

We need a Ramadhaan and it is clear. If there is any fear of Allaah left in the hearts of ours and if there is any hope of Jannaah left in us, and if there is any desire to change and to be better and to be righteous and to come to the level of Ihsaan, to come to the level of a Mumim, to have taqwa, to fear Allaah … we need a Ramadhaan.

We need a Ramadhaan, a month of Tawbaah.

We need a Ramadhaan, a month of Maghfira.

We need a Ramadhaan to correct our behaviour, to correct the differences & the difficulties and the envy / jealousies in our relationship between o­ne another.

We need a Ramadhaan to understand that we have been committing injustice to o­ne another.  And as the Prophet (sallallahu alayhi wa sallam) said : ‘Az-Zulm (injustice) – “Zulumaat yawmal Qiyaamah” –we’ll be changed physically into darkness o­n the Day of Judgement.’

We need a Ramadhaan to understand the Hadith : to fear the duaa of the o­ne to whom we have done injustice.  For there is not between Allaah and the person making the invocation, the person making that supplication of the person to whom injustice has been done, there is no veil between that person and Allaah. That duaa is immediately accepted.

The oppressor is the o­ne for whom things are not going right; He is tripping into this and falling into that;  He is Slipping there and sliding here. Why I can’t get ahead? Why I can’t progress in my Deen? Why I can’t memorize this ayah? Why I can’t understand this hadeeth? We may be living under the invocation, the answer for invocation for someone whom we abused or stepped over. You know you need a Ramadhaan. I know I need a Ramadhaan. We know we need a Ramadhaan. We need to get ourselves together. We’ve been running around in filth, we have been having our hearts around the low matters; We need our hearts to be around the thrones of Allaah; We need to think about the high matters, high goals; We need to think about Jannah; We need a hope for al-Jannah. 

You’re planning for marriage, you’re planning for education, you’re planning for a job, but we need to plan for the Jannah. We need to prepare for the Jannah during the month of Ramadhaan.

“‘Nahnu be haajathin Ma’aasa fir Ramadhaan.”

We are in severe need for Ramadhaan, so that we come into Ramdhaan with repentance, we come into it with regret, we come into it realizing that we are weak, that we need Allaah tabarak wa ta’ala to correct us, realizing that we are wrong and that we need Allaah tabarak wa ta’ala to place upon us that which is right, realizing that we are weak and that we need Allaah tabarak wa ta’ala to grant us strength. We need a Ramadhaan. Oh Yes !! We need a Ramadhaan.

We needs nights of Qiyaam, we need dua and sujood, we need nights of Ramadhaan to do thilawaah of Qura’an. We need to listen to Husri, or Sudays or Shurain, or Hudhaifi. We need a Ramadhaan to listen to the Qura’an. When was the last time that we listened to the Qura’an??  When was the last time we recited Qura’an? We need a Ramadhaan to study Qura’an, to implement the Qura’an, and this Ramadhaan may be our final Ramadhaan. As o­ne brother spoke, I believe it is Abu Thasleem Hafidahullaah, where is the guarantee that this is not our final Ramadhaan? What is the guarantee that it is not our final Ramadhaan? We have to come into it seriously. And we want to come out of it much better than we came into it. We want to come out of Ramadhaan with Taqwa, because that was the main reason that it was legislated.

“O you who believe fasting has been written upon  you as it was written for those before you, so that you may gain Taqwa.”

Taqwa is fear of Allaah. If we had taqwa, our condition will be better than  it is now. If we had taqwa our relationships would be smoother, if we had taqwa …father to son who is a Muslim, sister to brother who is Muslim, uncle, aunt, niece and nephew who is Muslim, husband and wife who are Muslims.. the relationships would be better if they are based upon Taqwa. And we can achieve Taqwa during the month of Ramadhaan. I don’t believe that our hearts are that hard, I don’t believe that we can’t change, I don’t believe that some of us who hold hatred for the last 10 years cannot learn to love, and because we have been taught deceit and deception now we can’t learn to trust.

I don’t believe that those brothers who have left circumstances physically but have the teachings and the behaviours that they had while they were up there, that they can’t change. The sisters who remove their bodies from the fitnah and physically remove their bodies from a mistake, physically remove their bodies from foolishness but their hearts have to follow. Be iznillaahi tha’aalah ! Their hearts have to follow.

We need a Ramadhaan to be as the Prophet (sallallahu alayhi wa sallam) was. That he was the most generous, he was generous in general and he was most generous in Ramadhaan. Like a wind … spending, giving to his right, giving to his left, giving in front of him, giving behind him, giving to anyone who came. He gave without them asking.

We need a Ramadhaan to inculcate these qualities. We need to control our desires. We need to control our tongue. We need to control our limbs. We need to learn self-discipline. We need to control our anger. We must do things in Ramadhaan not out of habit, something that is just tradition., that we are more despicable when we went in. We have to change our condition. We have to change our connection with Allaah tabarak wa ta’ala. For how light is the view of Allaah when they disobey Him. This is what was said by o­ne of the sahabas when he had the crown of the Persian King in his hand.

And the Prophet (sallallahu alayhi wa sallam) said, ‘that he had been sent before the hour. And my provision has been provided for me under the shade of my spear and humiliation has been written against anyone who goes against my orders. Humiliation has been written upon anyone who goes against my orders. If we want to continue in the position of humiliation that we are in, then do not take the grand opportunity act like it doesn’t exist, neglect and forget and be hard headed, be obstinate, follow your desires like you have been doing for the last 11 months and don’t benefit from Ramadhaan. And when our circumstances doesn’t change,  don’t say “Why?” You know why. For we need a Ramadhaan and we have to correct ourselves in this Ramadhaan. And that you are a part of this Ummah and if you have an illness, and if you are a member of this ummah with a sickness, with filth, with crime, this affects the rest of the Ummah. It is like your body when you have an illness. It is like when you have hurt your finger or your toe, it affects the rest of the body. And it doesn’t have to be said to you that the Prophet (sallallahu alayhi wa sallam) said,  “the believers are like o­ne body”. If we want to correct the position of the Ummah, then we must first start by correcting ourselves. Don’t worry about Ubyaid, Hassan and Musa, but worry about yourself. Be selfish this Ramadhaan. Not regarding giving sadaqa but where you are going to focus your rectification or how to rectify yourself. Your focus is going to be o­n yourself. Not worrying about this person and that person’s manhaj. Are you o­n the correct Manhaj?? Not worrying about whether a particular brother is o­n the bidah or the Sunnah. Are you upon the Sunnah?  Have those brothers stopped committing their sins — have you stopped committing that sin? Has the brother made tawbah —- Have you made tawbah?? Has the brother corrected a situation —– have you corrected your situation? Worry about yourself. Worry about yourself this Ramadhaan.

Any other Ramadhaan do what you will. But my sincere advice to you is, this Ramadhaan worry about yourself. Am I backbiting? Am I slandering? Am I committing fahishah? Am I committing gheebah? Am I committing Nameemah (tale-carrying)? Do I have ‘hasad’? Do I have pride (Kibr) ? Am I arrogant?  Am I too harsh? Am I unkind? Am I not gentle enough? Am I gentle enough? Question yourself. Was my intention when I said what I said or did what I did for the pleasure of Allaah or to be noticed?   When I spoke what I spoke was it for the pleasure of Allaah or to be seen or heard? Was I doing it “Haarisa min Qalbi’— sincerely from my heart or I did it to be known? ‘Khutbath Duroor’ — Loving to be known breaks it.

Be Mukhlis. Be sincere. Be like that servant of Allaah like the Hadith that has been related in the Kitaab al  tawheed of the soldier whose head is disheveled, who is bare-footed and dirty.. but he is sincere to Allaah. If he was placed at the rear of the army, he is pleased with that. And if he is placed in the front of the army he is displeased with that. His goal is Allaah tabarak wa ta’ala. Not where I sit. Not us and them, Not you and I but his brothers and sisters ..its the servants of Allaah, it is  the believers, it is the Muslim, the salafiyoon, it is Ahlul –athar, it is Ahlus-Sunnah, it is Ahlul-Hadith. No o­ne’ bigger and no o­ne is smaller . No o­ne wants to step o­n anyone nor desire that. All of us should be working for the pleasure of Allaah tabarak wa ta’ala.  And if we don’t we have an illness which is Riyaah — doing things to be seen or Sum’aah — doing things to be heard and we need a Ramadhaan to correct that behaviour.

If we find that we talk to the sisters or brothers too much, we need a Ramadhaan to learn to stop talking to those who are not halaal for us to talk to. And if we find that we are mixing too much, we need a Ramadhaan  to start mixing with those whom you are not supposed to mix with. We find that we have jealousy in our hearts, vengeance in our hearts, distrust in our hearts for other Muslims based upon nothing but  Shaitaan whispers to us, we need a Ramadhaan. 

We get all the good in front of us when we have the Book of Allaah tabarak wa ta’ala and the Sunnaah of the Messenger (sallallahu alayhi wa sallam) and the fahmas Salafus Saalih and the connection to the inheritors of the Prophet alaihissalaam – the Ulamaa – we got all the good in front of us but we are like that individual who has a disease and he has the prescription for the medicine in front of him but he refuses to open the package – let alone read it —– let alone take it.

We need a Ramadhaan, Our condition won’t change. We’ll continue to complain.

We need a Ramadhaan or we’ll forever be in pain. We need a Ramadhaan or we’ll go insane.

We need a Ramadhaan, you and I. Why can’t we lift up, roll up our sleeves? Why do we have to beat  the hands of o­ne another?  Why do we have to step o­n somebody to get somewhere? Why do we have to step o­n our brother – he wants to go to the same place  where you want to go? The Jannah. Why can’t we do it together? Why can’t we be side by side? You roll up your sleeves and I’ll roll up my sleeves, we’ll get busy and we’ll get help and support o­ne another.
 
Why can’t we make excuses? Why can’t we forgive? Why can’t we forget? Why can’t we let things go?  Upon clarity, upon Haqq, knowing the Sunnah, knowing the Deen, connected to the scholars, not preceding them in any statement or action and if they make a statement, we make their statement (not add our own), This is important. We need a Ramadhaan.

This blessed month where you can go in as the most despicable devil and come out like an angel. That blessed month when you can go in as a miser and come out as the generous … that blessed month where you can be o­ne of those hard-hearted brothers – (everybody usually gives you a smile but you don’t give anybody a smile) – and if you do it right, you’ll come out of Ramadhaan giving smiles to those brothers , not in the faces of the sisters but the faces of your brothers..

We need a Ramadhaan to correct our condition : we are slow, we are lazy, we don’t have any incentive towards the deen and the Aakhiraah, the Hereafter . Our incentives are towards the Dunya and if the opposite of this was true most of the neighbourhood around here would be Muslims. Many would enter Islaam in folds, as Sheikh Ubaid Madkhali Hafidaallaah says in his explanation of  ‘Usool as thalaathah’, that Islaam is a Mahaasin – the beauty of it is explained. Islaam he said is a Mu’jizaa minal Mu’jizaath’ — Islaam is a miracle of the Mircales. Ayah minal Ayaahs. It is that, when it is presented to the hearts, when it is presented to the people, and it is done in the right way, what happens? They enter Islaam ‘Afwaajan’ – in the multitudes.

He said that if o­ne of them has a business and we want to advertise, very few who wouldn’t advertise at all would say that “I have a business but I am going to be silent.” Business won’t be successful and no o­ne will benefit, he will loose. Generally a good business person gets a good advertisement – he may use the print media, he may use the radio, the audio media,  to get his advertisement  — his dawa’ah , he’ll call out so that people will come and he mixes in the most beautiful way and has the most beautiful response. This is what he does. The Sheikh said, ‘if we were to do that with Islaam, show its beauty, explain its Mahasin –its beauty, it is the natural fitrah of the person (unless his fitrah has been polluted) that he wants to know Islaam. He wants to know why he walks upon the earth. He wants to know his prayer. He wants to have his connection with his Creator. He wants to know the purpose of his existence. But who will explain it to him or her? Who will tell them? Who will open up those hearts? It is supposed to be ‘us’. 

Those of us who cannot express ourselves, what about our actions? If the person sees you are truthful , why you are truthful? Because Islaam teaches you truthfulness and you must be truthful and there is high martaba being truthful and minas-Siddeeqi is the o­nly martaba — level after the Prophets… It is the first level after the Prophets, rather. Closest to the prophet’s stations are those who are Siddiqeen, the most truthful. So you be truthful because of that. You keep your word because of that. You are gentle, you are nice, you have good behaviour, you have good etiquette, you have good deportment, so when it comes to Islaam it is Afwaajan. So if you don’t see them doing it, we are doing what we are not supposed to be doing. If we were doing what we are supposed to be doing, we would probably have to have this type of fundraising at o­ne of the football stadiums. If we are doing what we are supposed to be doing, people will be hearing Islaam from the radio, they will see articles written in the papers regularly, they would see good behaviour, they would see kindness and gentleness, patience and forbearance. They would see the qualities and characteristics of Mustapha sallallahu alaihi wassallam. i.e if we were doing our job. But we are not.  Not the male or the female. Not father or mother or child. We are not upon what we should be upon, we are not doing what we are supposed to be doing.

 We need a Ramadhaan to clarify our situation. We need a Ramadhaan to put us in position. We need a Ramadhaan to give this Ummah a rebirth, air ..   we have to understand that we are global. Whoever follows the Book of Allaah, the Sunnah of the Prophet (sallallahu alayhi wa sallam) and the Manhaj of the Salafus Saalih, then they are our closest brothers. And those who are upon ignorance, innovation, not mukaffarah, they are still brothers from a distant but from within this Ummah. So it affects all of us. And we are connected in that way.

If you sit there saying, ‘I don’t care what they do to the Muslims in India doesn’t concern me; I don’t care if they bomb Afghanistan up the planet… I don’t care…. it has nothing to do with me …then you are a racist, a nationalist, you are not a Salafi. Because a Salafi concerns himself about this Ummah. Salafi at night thinks about this Ummah. Salafi cries in his salaah about the condition of this Ummah, he cries about all locally, he cries about their condition internationally. We need a Ramadhaan so that we  can realize the Islaamic brotherhood again.

We need a Ramadhaan because some of them never practiced brotherhood ever in their lives and  may have been Muslims 50 years. We need a Ramadhaan so that the sisters learn sisterhood,

We need a Ramadhaan so that we can focus o­n the Aakhirah — Hereafter and we give Naseehah and advice to o­ne another that is of benefit and that our talking and our mixing is just not about the Dunya, and what you want to do in the Dunya and how you are gonna be in this Dunya.

We need a Ramadhaan so that people learn to inculcate in their children to be like Abu Bakr As-Siddeeq, Umar al-Khattab, Sa’ad abi Ibn Waqqas and like this. We need a Ramadhaan so that they can study knowledge. This Ummah needs another Bin Baaz, this Ummah needs another Al-Albani, this Ummah needs another Muqbil, this Ummah needs another Ibn Taimiyyah, this Ummah needs all of these and more. You are gonna tell me that none of them can come or no o­ne like them can from our families? None of them can come from us? Not everyone who comes from us have to be Goofi. Can’t our children speak the Arabic language at a young age? Can’t we put in the hands of our children books that will benefit the Ummah.. the same love the Kaafir have for  Harry Potter and their imaginary books? Our hope is low. Our desire is low. We are supposed to be having high goals. We should be looking at our kids Abdullaah and Abdurrahman and saying : You might be Sheikh Naasir for this Ummah. We should be saying when listening to Sudaisi and Shuraim that it could be you leading the salaah in haram. We are supposed to be having high goals.  But until we brush off the dust, the foolishness of the jaahiliyyah , the hastiness of the youth, the bad characteristics that we have, we have to get rid of them , we have to change our condition, we need aRamadhaan.

We need our Qiyaam at night, we need recitation of Qura’an, we need to sit together and talk together o­nly about the deen, not about the Dunya, we need to worry about our status in the Aakhirah, in the Hereafter. We need to wake up from our sleep. Wake up Oh Sleepy o­ne. !! our slumber has been too long. You got to wake up, take wudoo, get within the caravan of Mohamed Ibn Abdullah, Abu Bakr As-Siddeeq, Umar al-Khattab, Ibn Taimiyyah – you have to get with it. How long are we going to stay sick? How long are we going to be unsettled? How long are we going to have our problems? We need a Ramadhaan.  And let this Ramadhaan be the o­ne where you come out of it better, come out of it committed, come out of it devoted, you come out of it with your head held high. You are from the Ummah of the Prophet (sallallahu alayhi wa sallam) and don’t you forget it!!

Walhamdulillaahi rabbil aalameen.

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Respecting Our Differences

15 03 2008
“Waste no time debating what a good Muslim should be. Be one!”

by Muhammad Alshareef

Imam Malik one day entered the Masjid after Asr. Towards the front of Masjid An-Nabawee he drew closer and sat down. Rasul Allah had commanded that anyone who enters the Masjid should not sit until he first prays 2 rakas as a salutation of the Masjid. Imam Malik was of the opinion however that Rasul Allah’s forbiddance of praying after Asr took precedence and so he would teach his students to not pray the tahiyyatul Masjid if they entered between the Asr and Maghrib time.

At that moment that Imam Malik sat down, a young boy had seen him sit without first praying the 2 raka’s of Tahiyyatul Masjid. The young boy scorned him, “Get up and pray 2 rakas!”

Imam Malik dutifully stood up once again and began praying the 2 rakas. The students sat stunned: What was going on? Had Imam Malik’s opinion changed? After he had completed the salah, the students swarmed around and questioned his actions. Imam Malik said, “My opinion has not changed, nor have I gone back on what I taught you earlier. I merely feared that had I not prayed the 2 rakas as the young boy commanded, Allah may include me in the Ayah…

“And when it is said to them, ‘Bow (in prayer)’, they do not bow.” – al mursalat 77/48.

Imam Ahmad held the opinion that eating camel meat nullifies ones Wudhu, an opinion that the majority of scholars differed from. Some students asked him, “If you find an Imam eating camel meat in front of you and – without first making Wudu – then leads the Salah, would you pray behind him?” Imam Ahmad replied, “Do you think I would not pray behind the likes of Imam Malik and Sa’eed ibn Al-Musayyab?”

Allah created humans with differences. It is the law of creation. Different tongues, different colors, different cultures…all that on the outside. On the inside, humans were created with many degrees of knowledge, intellect, and comprehension of concepts. This is all a sign of Allah’s all encompassing power to do whatever He wills:

“And among His signs is the creation of the heavens and the earth, and the variations in your languages and your colors: verily in that are signs for those who know.” [30:22]

Humans shall differ, that is not the issue. The issue is: How as a Muslim should one confront these differences of opinions and what should be our relationship with someone of a different opinion.

Allah ta’ala commanded us to call and advise people in this Deen of Al-Islam. Many Muslims set off on this mission blindfolded, not realizing that the map was there in the Qur’an also. In fact, in the very same verse where Allah commanded us to call and advise people in this Deen, Allah taught us how to do it. Read the following verse carefully:

“Invite (fi’l Amr – Allah is commanding) to the way of your Lord with wisdom and good instruction and argue with them in a way that is best! ” – Surah An-Nahl 16/125.

There is no need to philosophize. No need to talk in the flower gardens. It is right there, plain and simple for anyone who would take heed.

There in that Ayah are the three ingredients to apply when we disagree with someone. The same Allah that taught us to debate the truth, taught us how to do it:

1 – With Hikmah (wisdom)
2 – With good instruction, and
3 – To argue in a way that is best.

What does it mean to have Hikmah when differing with someone? The grandsons of Rasul Allah(saw) once set one of the most beautiful examples of Hikmah in advising others. Al-Hasan and Al-Husayn – in their young age – once saw a senior man performing Wudu incorrectly. Together they arranged a plan to teach the man without insulting him, advising him in a manner befitting of his age.

Together they went to the senior and announced, “My brother and I have differed over who amongst us performs Wudu the best. Would you mind being the judge to determine which one of us indeed performs Wudu more correctly.”

The man watched intently as the two grandsons of Rasul Allah performed Wudu in an explicit manner. After they had completed, he thanked them and said, “By Allah, I did not know how to perform Wudu before this. You have both taught me how to do it correctly.”

We must understand that there are two dimensions to Hikmah. Firstly, there is the Hikmah of knowledge – Hikmah Ilmiyyah. And secondly, there is the Hikmah of Action – Hikmah Amaliyyah.

Some people may have Hikmah of knowledge. But we see that when they try correcting others, advising them, they lack the Hikmah of Action. This causes many a common folk to reject the Hikmah of knowledge.

To illustrate this hikmah of knowledge without Hikmah of action, a brother once completed the Salah in a local Masjid and then proceeded to shake hands with the people on his right and left. The brother to his immediate right slapped his hand and snapped, “That is not part of the Sunnah!” The man replied most correctly, “Oh, is disrespect and insult part of the Sunnah?”

To show Hikmah when we differ requires the following:

Sincerity

One: If we differ, our intentions should be that we are differing in the sincere hope of coming away with the truth. Our intentions should be sincere to Allah.

We should not differ just to release some hate or envy in our heart. We should not differ to embarrass someone like we may have been embarrassed.

Rasul Allah said, “Whoever learns knowledge – knowledge from that which should be sought for the sake of Allah – only to receive a commodity of the material world, he shall not find the fragrance of jannah on the day of resurrection.” – An authentic hadith narrated by Abu Dawood in Kitab Al-Ilm.

Kindness and Gentleness

Two: To have Hikmah when differing means we should rarely depart from an atmosphere of kindness and gentleness, we should seldom allow ourselves to become angry and raise our voices.

Fir’own (Pharaoh) was one of the evilest people that lived. Musa was one of the noblest. Look at how Allah told Musa to advise Fir’own…

“Go, both of you, to Fir’own. Indeed, he has transgressed. And speak to him with gentle speech, perhaps he may remember or fear (Allah).”

A man once entered upon the Khalifah and chastised him for some policies he had taken. The Khalifah replied, “By Allah, Fir’own was more eviler than me. And by Allah, Musa was more pious than you. Yet, Allah commanded him…’And speak to him with gentle speech, perhaps he may remember or fear (Allah).'”

Take Your Time and Clarify

Three: To have Hikmah when dealing with others is to be patient and clarify things before snapping to conclusions.

Imam Ahmad narrates with his chain of narrators leading to Ibn Abbas who said, “A man from Bani Saleem passed by a group of the Prophet’s companions. (At that time of war) The man said ‘as salamu alaykum’ to them. The companions concluded that he only said ‘as salamu alaykum’ to them as a deception to save himself from being caught. They surrounded him and Malham ibn Juthaamah killed him. From that event Allah revealed the verse…

“O you who have believed, when you go forth (to fight) in the cause of Allah, investigate, and do not say to one who gives you (a greeting of peace), “You are not a believer,” Aspiring for the goods of worldly life; for with Allah are many acquisitions. You (yourselves) were like that before; then Allah conferred His favor (i.e. guidance) upon you, so investigate. Indeed, Allah is ever with what you do, acquainted.” – Surah AnNisa, 4/94. From Tafseer Ibn Katheer.

Speak Kindly

Fourthly, never trade in kind words for harshness, especially when dealing with other Muslims.

Look at the power of a sincere and polite word: Mus’ab ibn Umayr was the first of ambassador of Rasul Allah in Madinah. Before Rasul Allah had arrived in Madinah, Mus’ab taught ahl al-Madinah about Islam and they began to enter the Deen.

This enraged Sa’d ibn ‘Ubaadah, one of the chieftains of Madinah. He sheathed his sword and set off for the head of Mus’ab ibn ‘Umayr. When he confronted Mus’ab he threatened, “Stop this nonsense you speak or you shall find yourself dead!”

Mus’ab replied in the way that should be a lesson for us all. This man before him did not stop at rudeness and ignorance, he wanted to slit his throat.

Mus’ab said, “Shall you not sit and listen for a few moments. If you agree with what I say then take it, and if not, we shall desist from this talk.” Sa’d sat down.

Mus’ab spoke about Allah and His messenger until the face of Sa’d ibn Ubaadah’s face shone like a full moon and he said, “What should a person do who wishes to enter into this Deen?” After Mus’ab had told him he said, “There is a man, if he accepts this Deen, there shall be no home in Madinah that will not become Muslim. Sa’d ibn Mu’aadh.”

When Sa’d ibn Mu’aadh heard what was happening, he was infuriated. He left his home to go and kill this man called Mus’ab ibn Umayr for the dissention he had caused. He entered upon Mus’ab and announced, “You shall desist of this religion you speak of or you shall find yourself dead!”

Mus’ab replied, “Shall you not sit and listen for a few moments. If you agree with what I say then take it, and if not, I shall desist from this talk.” Sa’d sat.

Mus’ab spoke about Allah and His messenger until the face of Sa’d ibn Mu’aadh’s face shone like a full moon and he said, “What should a person do who wishes to enter into this Deen?”

Look at what a kind word did. Sa’d ibn Mu’aadh went home to his Madinan tribe that night and announced to them all, “Everything of yours is Haram upon me until you all enter into Islam.”

That night, every home in Madinah went to bed with Laa ilaaha illa Allah…all because of a kind word.

Part II: Who wins?

Mu’aawiyah ibn al-Hakam al-Salami. When he came to Madeenah from the desert, he did not know that it was forbidden to speak during the salaah. He relates: “Whilst I was praying behind the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), a man sneezed, so I said ‘Yarhamuk Allaah (may Allaah have mercy on you).’ The people glared at me, so I said, ‘May my mother lose me! What is wrong with you that you are looking at me?’ They began to slap their thighs with their hands, and when I saw that they were indicating that I should be quiet, I stopped talking (i.e., I nearly wanted to answer them back, but I controlled myself and kept quiet).

When the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) had finished praying – may my father and mother be sacrificed for him, I have never seen a better teacher than him before or since – he did not scold me or hit me or put me to shame. He just said, ‘This prayer should contain nothing of the speech of men; it is only tasbeeh and takbeer and recitation of the Qur’aan.'” (Saheeh Muslim, ‘Abd al-Baaqi edn., no. 537).

Islam showed us how to differ with one another. Some people think that we should never differ at all and all disagreements should be avoided. Nay, this is an incorrect assumption, for the Qur’an and Sunnah show clearly that when a mistake is made it should be corrected. Indeed helping others do what is right is a requirement of the Deen, sincere Naseeha.

We see when Rasul Allah turned away from AbdAllah ibn Umm Maktoom, the blind man, Allah corrected him in the Qur’an…

“(The Prophet) frowned and turned away, Because there came to him the blind man But what could tell you that perchance he might become pure (from sins)? Or that he might receive admonition, and that the admonition might profit him?” – surah Abasa, 1-4

When Haatib ibn Abi Balta’ah (may Allaah be pleased with him) made the mistake of writing to the kuffaar of Quraysh and informing them of the direction in which the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) was headed on a military campaign against them, Allaah revealed the words:

“O you who believe! Take not My enemies and your enemies as friends…” – Surah Mumtahinah/1

And so on. Thus we learn that when a mistake happens it should be corrected. However, the method of correction is what needs our attention. Whenever Muslims argue, it is as if each party carries a banner of: ‘I must win and you must lose!’ Careful study of the Sunnah however shows us that this is not always the case with the way Rasul Allah acted. Consider the following examples:

“I lose and you win!”

A Bedouin came to Rasul Allah and told him, “Give me from what Allah gave you, not from the wealth of your mother nor from the wealth of your father.” The Sahaabah were furious at the man and step forward to discipline him for what he said. Rasul Allah commanded everyone to leave him.

Then by the hand, Rasul Allah took him home, opened his door and said, “Take what you wish and leave what you wish.” The man did so and after he completed, Rasul Allah asked him, “Have I honored you?” “Yes, by Allah,” said the Bedouin. “Ash hadu an laa ilaaha illa Allah, wa ashhadu anna Muhammadar Rasul Allah.” (Meaning he embraced Islam)

When the Sahabah heard of how the man changed, Rasul Allah taught them. “Verily the example of myself, you and this Bedouin is that of a man who had his camel run away. The townspeople tried capturing the camel for him by running and shouting after the camel, only driving it further away. The man would shout, ‘Leave me and my camel, I know my camel better.’ Then he took some grass in his hand, ruffled it in front of the camel, until it came willingly.

‘By Allah, had I left you to this Bedouin, you would have hit him, hurt him, he would have left without Islam and eventually have entered hellfire.”

“I win and you lose!”

A Muslim should not have an apologetic stance to everything he is confronted with. There are times when the truth must be said, when there is no room for flattery.

When the Makhzoomi women – a women from an affluent family – stole, people approached Rasul Allah to have her punishment canceled. Rasul Allah became very angry and stood on the pulpit and announced, “By Allah, had Fatima the daughter of Muhammad stole I would have cut her hand off.”

No room for flattery, the truth must be stood up for. It is here that the etiquette of disagreement that we talked earlier about should shine.

“I win and you win!”

There doesn’t always have to be a loser. We see in many cases that Rasul Allah gave a way out for the people he differed with. When he sent the letter to Caesar, he said in it, “Become Muslim and you shall be safe, Allah shall give you your reward double!”

He did not say surrender or die! Nothing of the sort. Become Muslim and you shall win, rather your victory shall be double.

I shall end with this shining example of how to act with other Muslims from our role model, Abu Bakr:

Abu Bakr once disputed with another companion about a tree. During the dispute Abu Bakr said something that he rather would not have said. He did not curse, he did not attack someone’s honor, he did not poke a fault in anyone, all he said was something that may have hurt the other companion’s feelings.

Immediately, Abu Bakr – understanding the mistake – ordered him, “Say it back to me!” The companion said, “I shall not say it back.” “Say it back to me,” said Abu Bakr, “Or I shall complain to the Messenger of Allah.” The companion refused to say it back and went on his way.

Abu Bakr went to Rasul Allah and related what had happened and what he said. Rasul Allah called that companion and asked him, “Did Abu Bakr say so and so to you?” He said, “Yes.” He said, “What did you reply.” He said, “I did not reply it back to him.” Rasul Allah said, “Good, do not reply it back to him (do not hurt Abu Bakr). Rather say, ‘May Allah forgive you O Abu Bakr!'” The Companion turned to Abu Bakr and said, “May Allah forgive you O Abu Bakr! May Allah forgive you O Abu Bakr!” Abu Bakr turned and cried as he walked away. Let us leave today with a resolve to revive this air Rasul Allah and his companions breathed, an air of mercy and love and brotherhood.

http://english.islamway.com/bindex.php?section=article&id=254





You Might Not Like What You See….

20 01 2008

I would wager that the title of this blog will apply to  most people both Muslims and Non Muslims.  As human beings we have an inordinate need to please ingrained in us from a young age. We all want to the be the best at what we do. We want to excell and be pointed to as a model or perfect example of the correct way. However, many of us take this to one of two extremes. Either we deny that we care and go into a rebellious stage or we admit to ourselves that we do care and set out in life killing ourselves to be the best.

I have also noticed that people of the second category tend to take constructive criticism horribly. They may lash out and point out YOUR faults if you try to advise them or they may come up with “conspiracy theories” as to why anyone would dare to say something to them when they are clearly in the wrong.  They expect everyone to sweep their faults under the rug and remain silent as they continually commit wrong actions. Whereas, they are the first to point out anyone else’s wrong actions. In fact, most people of the second category take great pleasure in pointing out the faults of others. Perhaps, it makes them feel as if they are better, they are succeeding in their quest to be the best.

 On the other hand, the rebellious group just acts as if they could care less. Did I bring home a paycheck this week? Ummm…… Did I make my five daily prayers…..<shrug> I don’t remember. And so on…..

Both types of behavior are destructive. As Muslims, we should know better than to fall into either category, but Alas! we are humans and most of us do fall into one of the two categories mentioned here.

Not only do we compete as to who has the biggest house, the most intelligent children, or the nicest vehicle. We also make our religion a competition.  We compare which of us  have a greater following, which of us can speak the best, which of us can read Quran with the most beautiful voice, which of us get the most positive comments, which of us has the most viewers on our blogs (hence the need to put how many views we have on the front page) and so on.

 Don’t get me wrong, competing to do good deeds is good. Encouraging each other and motivating each other to fulfill our obligations and even try to do the voluntary actions is a very noble cause.

Sadly, though, our competition today is not like this. Our competition is a popularity contest. And I wonder sometimes if it is even for the sake of Allah (SWT) or if it is just to show each other up and appear to be the most pious. I wonder if it isn’t feeding some type of “me syndrome” the need to be the center of attention, the sort of teacher’s pet thing we deal with in elementary school or the desire to be in the “in crowd.” We take this competition to disgustingly low levels of slander, backbiting, and smear campaigns. We stop at nothing to drag the other people’s names through the mud so that we may come out on top, the shining example of piety and grace.

That’s something to think about. Something that I have been thinking about for several days now.  I think we all need to take the time to look inside ourselves and examine what we find, the good, the bad, and the downright ugly of it.  For me this time has been after the fajr (pre dawn) prayer. The house is quiet, peaceful, serene, and I have time to sort through my muddled thoughts and evaluate myself and my situation.  With the daily distractions around us, it is easy to jump to conclusions and assumptions. However, when it is just you and your Creator with all the worldly distractions gone, you may be surprised how you view things. I know I was surprised, shocked, and even terrified by what I saw when I sat down and really evaluated my life. I found that I had been in the wrong far too often….. Insh’Allah I will definatley be making changes. Will you?





The Last Sermon of The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him)

20 10 2007

Mash’Allah this is truly beautiful! Insh’Allah wa can all read this, ponder it and benefit from it.

Last Sermon of the Prophet Muhammad (PBUH)

 
This sermon was delivered on the Ninth Day of Islamic month of Dhul-Hijjah Year 632 A.C (10 A.H.) in the ‘Uranah valley of Mount Arafat’ in Mecca.
After praising and thanking Allah the Prophet (saws) said:”O People, lend me an attentive ear, for I know not whether after this year I shall ever be amongst you again. Therefore listen to what I am saying very carefully and take these words to those who could not be present here today.O People, just as you regard this month, this day, this city as Sacred, so regard the life and property of every Muslim as a sacred trust. Return the goods entrusted to you to their rightful owners. Hurt no one so that no one may hurt you. Remember that you will indeed meet your Lord, and that he will indeed reckon your deeds. Allah has forbidden you to take usury (interest), therefore all interest obligations shall henceforth be waived. Your capital is yours to keep. You will neither inflict nor suffer any inequity. Allah has judged that there shall be no interest and that all the interest due to Abbas ibn ‘Abd’al Muttalib [the Prophet’s uncle] be waived.Every right arising out of homicide in pre-islamic days is henceforth waived and the first such right that i waive is that arising from the murder of Rabiah ibn al Harithibn.O People, the unbelievers indulge in tampering with the calender in order to make permissible that which Allah forbade, and to forbid that which Allah has made permissible. With Allah the months are twelve in number. Four of them are holy, three of these are successive and one occurs singly between the months of Jumada and Shaban.Beware of Satan, for the safety of your religion. He has lost all hope of that he will be able to lead you astray in big things, so beware of following him in small things.

O People, it is true that you have certain rights with regard to your women but they also have rights over you. Remember that you have taken them as your wives only under Allah’s trust and with His permission. If they abide by your right, then to them belongs the right to be fed and clothed in kindness. Do treat your women well and be kind to them for they are your partners and committed helpers. And it is your right that they do not make friends with anyone of whom you do not approve, as well as never to be unchaste. O People, listen to me in earnest, worship Allah, say your five daily prayers, fast during the month of Ramadhan, and give your wealth in Zakat. Perform Hajj if you can afford to.

All mankind is from Adam and Eve, an Arab has no superiority over a non-Arab nor a non-Arab has any superiority over an Arab; also a white has no superiority over a black nor a black has any superiority over a white – except by piety and good action. Learn that every Muslim is a brother to every Muslim and that the Muslims constitute one brotherhood. Nothing shall be legitimate to a Muslim which belongs to a fellow Muslim unless it was given freely and willingly. Do not therefore do injustice to yourselves. Remember one day you will meet Allah and answer your deeds. So beware: do not stray from the path of righteousness after I am gone.

O People, no prophet or apostle will come after me, and no new faith will be born. Reason well, therefore, O People, and understand my words which I convey to you. I leave behind me two things, the Qur’an and my Sunnah and if you follow these you will never go astray.

All those who listen to me shall pass on my words to others and those to others again; and may the last ones understand my words better than those who listen to me directly. Be my witness, O Allah, that I have conveyed Your message to Your people.”

Mountains of Makkah by Zain Bhika (drums):





Eid Al Fitr Around The World

11 10 2007

Here in the United States, the way eid is celebrated varies greatly. We have many  nationalities and communities of Muslims. In the communities populated mostly by Pakistani/Indian Muslims you will see Eid celebrated with many of the traditional  foods and customs of Pakistan and India. Likewise if you go to a community with predominatley Arabs you will see more of the Arab culture and cuisine.  If you live n a largely Cuminpopulated Islamic community you are likely to find grand celebrations. Entire stadiums may be rented out to hold the eid prayer and street fairs and festivals may be held. However, if you live in a small community you may have the  prayer and potluck style dinner at the local masjid or you may not even see any celebration at all (depending on the size of the community).

I love large diverse Muslim communities. You get the best of everything. You have Indian, Pakistan, Arab, Indonesian, Malaysian, African, and yes even American food and amusements. It’s all woven together.  When I see these types of communities, It makes me feel proud to be a Muslim.  It reminds me of all the different colors and cultures that make up the Ummah. Yet, we are all together as brothers and sisters united for a common goal (ie. to be the best Muslims we can be and eventually enter Jannah together, insh’Allah).

Honestly, I love learning about other cultures. So, I thought it would be interesting to do a post on how eid is celebrated in other countries. Most of this info is from either wikipedia or people I know.

To begin….

Videos:

Eid in Cairo,Egypt

Eid in Ghana

Eid in Indonesia

Eid in Bangladesh

Singapore/Malaysia:

Eid in Morocco

Eid in London:

Eid in Portland, OR USA

Eid in Madrid, Spain

Eid in Abu Dhabi, UAE

Eid in Bejing, China

Eid in Mecca

Eid Music Videos (contain music):

In Malaysia, Singapore, and Brunei Eid is often referred to as as Hari Raya Aidilfitri or Hari Raya Puasa. Hari Raya is translated as “Grand Day”.  Eid is the biggest holiday in Malaysia, and is the most awaited one. Shopping malls and bazaars are filled with people days ahead of Hari Raya, causing a distinctive festive atmosphere throughout the country. Many banks, government and private offices are closed for this holiday, which usually lasts a week.

Most people return to their home towns to celebrate eid. In many of the communites people hang oil lamps. Also, the takbir can be heard in the musallas and masjids. Many Malaysians wear the traditional Malay clothing for eid. The men’s clothing is called baju malayu and the women’s is baju kurung of baju kebaya. Many popular dishes are served on Eid such as ketupat, dodol, and lemang (rice cake cooked in bamboo).

After the Eid prayer many Malaysians visit graves, clean them, and recite surat yaseen.  It is also customary to offer apologies to anyone they may have wronged.  Most of the holiday is spent visiting friends and family. Children are often given money or other tokens on eid. To read more about Eid in Singapore visit Adik’s blog:

http://adikbongsu.wordpress.com/2007/10/03/celebrating-eid-in-singapore/

 Indonesia shares many of the traditions of Malaysia, Singapore, and Brunei.  The holiday is likewise referred to as Hari Raya Idul Fitri or lebaran (holiday).  It is also recognized as a national holiday. So, schools and institutions close.  It is also customary in Indonesian culture to offer apologies on the Day of Eid. . Many Indonesian muslims acknowledge that on the day of Eid when they forgive each other, their sins with each other are cleansed and they are without sin just as they were at birth.

At the night of the last day of Ramadan, Indonesians usually do ‘Takbiran’. Takbiran is a big celebration where people, from little children to old men, recite the takbir with a microphone in a parade. They travel around the town and usually they hit ‘beduk’, a large drum, as a background music of the takbir.

In South Asia (Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka):

At the end of the Holy month of Ramadan, in which the Muslims are asked to observe fasting from dawn to dusk and do extra prayers and observe religious values rigidly, the Muslims celebrate the sighting of the new moon (start of the new Muslim month). In Bangladesh,India and Pakistan, the night before Eid is called Chand Raat, or night of the moon. People visits bazaars and shopping malls, with their families and children, for last momemts Eid shopping. Women, especially young girls, often paint each others’ hands with traditional “henna” and wear colourful bangles.

The popular way of greeting in Bangladesh, India & Pakistan during celebration of this festival is to say Eid Mubarak to others.Children are encouraged to meet and greet the elders. In exchange of this they also expect to obtain some cash money, called Eidi, from the elders.

On the morning of Eid ul-Fitr, after taking a fresh bath, every Muslim is encouraged to wear new clothes, if they can afford so. Alternatively, they may wear clean washed clothes.Men and boys go to mosque or open fields called Eidgah for special Eid prayers, thanking God for enabling a Muslim to observe the holy month meaningfully. The Muslims are ordained to pay Zakat al-Fitr (special charity money) or fitra to the poor and needy before the Eid prayer, so that they can also join others to celebrate the Eid.

After the prayers, the congregation is dispersed and the Muslims meet and greet each other including family members, children, elders, friends and neighbours.

Some Muslims especially go to graveyards to pray for the salvation of the departed soul. Usually, children visit elder relatives and neighbours to pay respects and greetings.

One of the special dishes in India, Pakistan and Fiji is sivayyan, a dish of fine, toasted vermicelli noodles [4]. In Bangladesh, sivayyan is called shemai, and is an integral item of Eid dishes.

After meeting the friends and relatives, many people go for attending parties, feasts, special carnivals and festivities in the parks (with picnics, fireworks, etc.). In Bangladesh and Pakistan, many bazaars, malls, and restaurants witness huge crowd & high attendance during this principal muslim festival.

Some people also avail this opportunity to distribute Zakat, the obligatory tax on ones wealth, to the needy.

In this way, the Muslims of South Asia celebrate their Eid ul-Fitr in festive mood by thanking the Almighty and bringing their families, friends and the poor and needy people closer in a praiseworthy eagalitarian manner. (From: Wikipedia)

In Iran:

In morning of the Eid, a huge population go for Eid prayer, and after that every body go to his relatives home for eid visiting.

All Iranians even in other countries call each other to say happy eid.
People wear their beautiful clothes and there are many gathering and programs and ceremonies.

TV has spc programs and all lights are on in the streets.. (from Sharazad)

To read more about Eid in Iran, visit Sharazad’s post: http://shahrzaad.wordpress.com/2007/10/13/women-and-eid-prayer-tehran-iran/

Called Eyde Fetr by most Iranians, charity is important on that day. Typically, each Muslim family gives food to those in need. Often meat or ghorbani (literally translated as sacrifice, for it is usually a young lamb or calf that is sacrificed for the occasion), which is an expensive food item in Iran, will be given by those in wealthier families to those who have less. Payment of fitra or fetriye is obligatory for each Muslim. (From: Wikipedia)

In Turkey:

In Turkey, where Ramadan is infused with more national traditions (and where country-wide celebrations, religious and secular alike, are altogether referred to as Bayram), it is customary for people to greet one another with “Bayramınız Mübarek Olsun” (same as “Eid mubarak”), “Bayramınız Kutlu Olsun” (kutlu is calque for mubarak). It is a time for people to attend services, put on their best clothes (referred to as “Bayramlık”, often purchased just for the occasion) and to visit all their loved ones (such as friends, relatives and neighbors) and pay their respects to the deceased with organized visits to cemeteries, where large, temporary bazaars of flowers, water (for watering the plants adorning a grave), and prayer books are set up for the three-day occasion. Municipalities all around the country organize public shows such as concerts or more traditional forms of entertainment such as the Karagöz and Hacivat shadow-theatre or performences by the Mehter, the Janissary Band that was founded during the days of the Ottoman Empire as well as fundraising events for the poor. It is regarded as especially important to honor elderly citizens by kissing their right hand and placing it on one’s forehead while wishing them Bayram greetings. It is also customary for children to go around the neighborhood, door to door, and wish everyone a happy “Bayram”, for which they are awarded candy, chocolates, traditional sweets such as Baklava and Lokum (Turkish delight), or a small amount of money at every door, almost in a Halloween-like fashion. Helping the poor, ending past animosities and making up, organizing breakfasts and dinners for loved ones and putting together neighborhood celebrations are all part of the joyous occasion, where streets are generally decorated and lit up for the celebrations, and television and radio channels broadcast special Bayram programs (from: Wikipedia)

In Egypt, Eid El Fitr is a 3 day feast in which people have an official holiday in Egypt. Muslims start the celebrations by going to the mosques to perform a special prayer call the Feast holiday after sunrise where men women and children listen to a religious speech in which Imam usually reminds Muslims of the virtues and good deeds they should do to friends, relatives, neighbors and even strangers during Eid el Fetr and throughout the year.

After the prayers Egyptians usually visit families and offer sweets made specially for this occasion called the feast sweets or Kahk. Bisuits are also made in multiple flavors either at home or at candy shops which consider this occasion a profitable one because although most people used to bake Kahk themselves, nowadays many Egyptians buy the sweets from shops.

Family visits are considered a must on the first day of the Eid so they have the rest of days to enjoy by going to parks, cinemas, theatres or the beaches. Some like to go on tours or Nile cruise. Sharm El Sheikh is considered a favorite spot for spending holidays is Egypt.

Eid El Fitr is indeed a time for celebration but it is also a time for sharing as there is a special charity in the Eid called the “Sadaka” or the Eid el Fitr Charity which is paid by every Muslim before the end of Ramadan and given to the poor to be able to buy new clothes and kahk during the feast.

In Egypt People like to celebrate with others so apart from the crowded streets you are likely to have fun if you spend your holiday during Eid el Fitrs in Egypt.

In Saudi Arabia:

RIYADH/JEDDAH, 5 November 2005 — Spectacular fireworks, captivating folklore dances, orchestras led by well-known singers and other recreational programs marked Eid festivities across Saudi Arabia yesterday.

Authorities in Makkah, Madinah, Riyadh, Jeddah, Dammam, Abha and other cities have lined up a variety of entertainment programs throughout the Eid Al-Fitr holidays.

In Riyadh, firework displays illuminated the city’s skyline in rainbow colors, while many people went to dance and sing on the rhythm of folk bands. Prince Sattam, deputy governor of Riyadh region, also took part in a sword dance with a troupe of young men and children.

The highlight of the celebrations were the fireworks, which turned the whole city into a wonderland of light and color. It produced a fantastic variety of enormous glittering patterns in the night sky. Up to 150 were loosed off at one time. Commonly used fireworks especially huge fountains, aerial bomb-bursts, sparklers and cones produced spectacular visual effects, much to the joy of the crowds.

The city wore a festive look. A huge length of electric cabling and over 100,000 light bulbs were used to decorate the city. “The illuminations represent the joy and wonder that are always part of the Eid celebrations and reflect the rich diversity of entertainment activities on offer,” said a technician working with the Riyadh Development Authority.

“With hundreds of trees and street poles all lit up for the occasion, no one visiting the capital for Eid will miss its unique character of celebrations,” said Ayesha Parvez, a housewife visiting the city with her husband.

One of the many shows includes a daredevil car and motorbike show held in a makeshift camp on the eastern ring road. “One can see a man driving a motorbike on a 60 degree slanting surface or another jumping through a ring of daggers and fires,” said Shahid Ashraf Khan, who went to see the exciting stunts.

In Jeddah, the festivities started with an opera led by well-known Saudi singer Muhammad Abdu with the accompaniment of folk dances.

Five locations in the city have been identified for firework displays, according to Prince Faisal ibn Abdul Majeed, chairman of the festival’s executive committee.

Thousands of Saudi and expatriate families converged on the Corniche to watch the fireworks causing traffic jams in many places last night and the night before. “In fact, cars were moving bumper-to-bumper along all roads leading to the Corniche,” a Saudi driver said.

“We set out an hour before midnight and took three hours to reach the Corniche,” said Abdul Karim Hashim, a Saudi IT professional. He said he was against the idea of going to the Corniche because of the expected rush but had to yield to the wishes of his two daughters who wanted to watch the fireworks.

In most parts of the Corniche, families occupied vintage points along the long stretch of the beach enjoying the fireworks. Children were seen playing with their toys and their parents savoring snacks and drinks that they had brought along.

Amusement and recreation spots along the Corniche were also full of families with their young ones enjoying various rides.

There have been no reports of any ugly incidents during the celebrations so far except power outages in parts of both Riyadh and Jeddah.

Check out more first hand accounts by Global Voices authors on how eid is celebrated in their countries:

http://www.globalvoicesonline.org/2005/11/03/eid-around-the-world/

And I would love to hear how you celebrate Eid!

EID MUBARAK (BLESSED EID) EVERYBODY!!! SELAMAT HARI RAYA! 🙂





More on Muslims 9/11, Terrorism, Bin Laden Video

12 09 2007

ISLAM-OPED: 9/11 EVOKES PAINFUL MEMORIES FOR U.S. MUSLIM – TOP

ISLAM-OPED is a national syndication service of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) designed to offer an American Muslim perspective on current political, social and religious issues. ISLAM-OPED commentaries are offered free-of-charge to one media outlet in each market area. Permission for publication will be granted on a first-come-first-served basis.

CONTACT: ihooper@cair.com
TEL: Ibrahim Hooper, 202-488-8787, 202-744-7726 (c)

Please consider the following commentary for publication.

ISLAM-OPED: 9/11 EVOKES PAINFUL MEMORIES FOR U.S. MUSLIM
By Danette Zaghari-Mask
WORD COUNT: 471

[Danette Zaghari-Mask is executive director of the Orlando chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-Orlando). CAIR is the nation’s largest Muslim civil rights and advocacy group. Contact her at: dmask@cair.com For a photo, see: http://www.cair.com/Chapters.aspx#Orlando]

On the anniversary of 9/11, the memory of those once full of life evoke painful thoughts. I cringe at the panic that they must have endured, and join the mourning of fellow Americans who lost loved ones.

Even if we did not know someone directly effected by the tragedy, we know where we were when the towers fell or when the Pentagon was hit.
I delivered my first child 13 days after 9/11. In the days leading up to his birth, I wept.

I wept as a human, as an American and as a Muslim sickened by the reports of militants who claimed “victory” under the banner of Islam.
I gave birth and then cried as a mother for having endured, only to bring a new life into such a troubled world.

Since that time, opportunities have arisen to speak to my fellow Americans about Islam and Muslims. I, like millions of Muslims across the world, stood in solidarity against terrorism and a firm conviction that Islam, by its very definition, rejects terrorism.
Islam is an Arabic word that translates as “peace through submission to God.”

Those who perpetrated the 9/11 attacks did not discriminate between people of different faiths; rather, they discriminated against every person who did not submit to their twisted ideology.

The perpetrators of 9/11, and those with an agenda to silence the moderate Muslim majority, want us all to believe that Islam itself is the instigator of terror. If we can defeat those ideas in our own minds, we can defeat the mesmerizing effect of those who seek interfaith division and discord.

There are an estimated 1.2 billion Muslims in the world who overwhelmingly desire peace and look to Islam for inspiration.

I am teaching my son the Quran, the Muslim holy book. He is learning that if someone kills another it is “as though he has slain all mankind, and he who saved one life should be regarded as though he has saved the lives of all mankind” (5:32).

He is learning the sayings of the Prophet Muhammad: “The best jihad is saying a word of truth in the court of an unjust ruler” and a believer is one “in whom all of mankind has a sanctuary for its life and property.”

Today, I have more optimism and more reasons to be hopeful than six years ago.
My son celebrated his birthday early this year with contagious courage and spirit. His smile is so wide I think sometimes it will touch the creases of his brown eyes.

He and all of our children are, after all, the possibility beyond the borderline that creates “us” and “them.” The memory of 9/11 motivates me to raise my son to achieve his full potential.

Our children are seeds of peace and, with the right nurturing, future friends of peace.

—–

CAIR: U.S. MUSLIM GROUP BLASTS BIN LADEN VIDEO – TOP
United Press International, 9/11/07
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Top_News/2007/09/11/us_muslim_group_blasts_bin_laden_video/6189/

A Washington-based U.S. Muslim advocacy group Tuesday condemned a new video in which Osama bin Laden praises a Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist.

Posted on Islamic Web sites, the video does not show bin Laden but has a still photo of the al-Qaida founder and about 14 minutes of bin Laden purportedly talking about one of the hijackers.

Al-Qaida claimed responsibility for the hijackings and the suicide airliner attacks on the World Trade Center in New York and the Pentagon near Washington six years ago.

“The despicable actions of the 9/11 hijackers should be repudiated by all Muslims, not praised as examples to follow,” a statement from the Council on American-Islamic Relations said. “There can be no moral, ethical or religious justification for such cowardly attacks on innocent civilians. CAIR joins with Americans of all faiths in mourning the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001, and asks that we all use today’s anniversary to enhance our efforts to repudiate religious extremism and to promote mutual understanding.” (MORE)

SEE ALSO:

CAIR-NY: MUSLIMS MOURN 9/11 VICTIMS – TOP

(NEW YORK, NY, 9/11/2007) — The New York chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-NY) participated in a moment of silence for the victims of the 9/11 attacks at Sunday’s “Muslim Day Parade” in that city.

Hundreds marched down Madison Avenue to celebrate their commitment to interfaith peace and tolerance. CAIR-NY Civil Rights Director Aliya Latif joined Senator Bill Perkins, Councilmember Robert Jackson and other community leaders to address parade attendees.

“CAIR-NY mourns with all Americans over the tragedy at Ground Zero,” said CAIR-NY Community Affairs Director Faiza Ali. “We send our sincere condolences to the families of 9/11 victims. Their loved ones will not be forgotten.”

CAIR, America’s largest Muslim civil liberties group, has 33 offices, chapters and affiliates nationwide and in Canada. Its mission is to enhance the understanding of Islam, encourage dialogue, protect civil liberties, empower American Muslims, and build coalitions that promote justice and mutual understanding.

CONTACT: CAIR-NY Civil Rights Director Aliya Latif, 212-870-2002, 732-429-4268, alatif@cair.com

CAIR-AZ: READERS REFLECT ON LIFE 6 YEARS AFTER 9/11 – TOP
Arizona Republic, 9/11/07
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/arizonaliving/articles/0911911reflections.html

Initially, Fawzia Tung didn’t think the attacks on Sept. 11 really affected her life. She was wrong. She soon realized it had a big impact on the way she viewed her religion.

Tung, 50, is a Chinese Muslim living in Phoenix and working for the Council on American-Islamic Relations. But it was only after the attacks that Tung unconsciously took her life down a more politically active path.

At the time of the attacks, Tung was a stay-at-home mom to seven children. She felt very free living in the U.S., able to practice her faith openly. She had no qualms about wearing her scarf in public because nobody paid any notice. But things changed the day the four planes crashed.

“Right after it happened, I was terribly conscious I was wearing a scarf,” she said. “I felt like everybody was looking at me.”

Her husband urged her to stay home if she could. He would do the grocery shopping, a monumental offer. For Tung, it was stay home or heed her husband’s advice to go out without her scarf, an option she had never until that moment considered.

“I know a number of friends who took it (the scarf) off right after 9/11,” she said.

Tung was conflicted. She always considered her relationship with Allah a private one. But her scarf became a symbol in the wake of the attacks.

“It was never a social thing before. All of a sudden it became something different,” Tung said.

A woman at a garage sale told Tung she supported her and held no ill will toward Muslims.

She decided to stand tall for her religion. Tung went to work at an Islamic school and later joined the staff at CAIR.

Looking back, Tung believes the social effects of the attacks had a positive influence on her.

“I didn’t do anything particularly Islamic before that,” she said. “I was just living my life.”

CAIR: A HIJACKED IDENTITY: MUSLIM AMERICAN REFLECTS ON SEPT. 11 – TOP
National Public Radio, 9/11/07

LISTEN: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=14318955

The events of Sept. 11 changed the lives of many Americans, including American Muslims. Arsalan Iftikhar, a regular contributor, and former representative to the Council on American Islamic Relations, explains how the attacks impacted his work as a spokesman for Muslim Americans in the national media.

CAIR-CA REP REFLECTS ON EFFECTS OF 9/11 – TOP
Munira Syeda, Orange County Register, 9/11/07
http://www.ocregister.com/life/style-span-font-1840625-bold-weight

Scurrying about my Berkeley apartment six years ago, I was preparing to leave for a journalism conference in Lake Tahoe. I turned on the TV, and noticed morning news programs running footage of the collapsing Twin Towers. On first impulse, I dismissed the coverage as a faraway international disaster.

Soon, reality hit me. Grief over loss of 3,000 innocent lives replaced indifference, and then quickly gave way to fear. I cringed, secretly praying – God, don’t let it be Muslims. Before long, America learned al-Qaida was behind the attacks.

Over the years, I have spent considerable time educating co-workers, friends and strangers about the basic tenets of Islam, its principles of respect, brotherhood, establishment of human rights and peace and justice. However, I have also observed tremendous backlash against all things Muslim.

From prejudice to discrimination to outright hatred, the American Muslim community has been targeted frequently by a minority who view American Muslims as the “other.” In fact, a USA Today/Gallup Poll conducted last year shows strong feelings against Muslims. Nearly 40 percent of the respondents claimed having at least some prejudice toward Muslims. Another estimated 40 percent also favored having Muslims bear special identification to prevent future terror attacks on our soil.

Despite that, there also has been much support and sympathy offered to the Muslim community after 9/11. Japanese Americans, the Latino and African American communities, Christian, Jewish and other faith observers have stood by Muslims during difficult times. They too had personally experienced, or witnessed discrimination and prejudice promoted against various other minorities. Native Americans were driven out of their homeland, Blacks were enslaved and segregated against, and Japanese Americans were interned. As new immigrants, Jews, Asians, Italians and Catholics weren’t treated any better either.

As I write this column, I ponder the post 9/11 world we live in. I think about the irrational fear that has gripped us and impacts our judgment. The continued civil rights violations and the controversial Patriot Act, the aggressive call for profiling of Muslims and Arabs at airports and other places, the misadventure in Iraq, and the political turmoil the Bush Administration is embroiled in are all examples of this fear.

We proudly claim how 9/11 has not changed us or our values. Let us look around, though. We are now a nation consumed by an alarming level of polarization. The Democrat and the Republican split, the pro-war/anti-war camps, and the conservative versus liberal factions are a symptom of the deeper unrest and anxiety challenging our society.

Nonetheless, I believe in America as a great country for not only Muslims but people of all backgrounds and colors. Our nation’s greatness lies in the founding principles of pluralism, inclusion and equality for all.

Americans used to converse with each other. We used to dialogue. Now, we bicker. We compete in who can shout louder. We feel so threatened by the other side that we quickly attempt to silence it.

We must change our ways. We must make a concerted effort to change our un-American policies and attitudes. Otherwise, we will have allowed al-Qaida to redefine America, and not for the better.

[Munira Syeda is Communications Coordinator for Council on American-Islamic Relations, Greater Los Angeles Area.]

In the Name of God, the Compassionate, the Merciful
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CAIR CONDEMNS BIN LADEN’S PRAISE FOR 9/11 HIJACKER
(WASHINGTON, D.C., 9/11/07) – The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) today condemned a new video by Osama bin Laden in which the terror leader eulogizes a 9/11 hijacker.

In a statement, the Washington-based Islamic civil rights and advocacy group said:

“The despicable actions of the 9/11 hijackers should be repudiated by all Muslims, not praised as examples to follow. There can be no moral, ethical or religious justification for such cowardly attacks on innocent civilians. CAIR joins with Americans of all faiths in mourning the tragic events of September 11, 2001, and asks that we all use today’s anniversary to enhance our efforts to repudiate religious extremism and to promote mutual understanding. ”

CAIR issued a joint American Muslim statement of condemnation within hours of the 9/11 attacks and published a similar statement in a full-page advertisement in the Washington Post just days later.

SEE: CAIR Full Page Advertisement, Sunday, September 16, 2001, Washington Post
SEE ALSO: U.S. Muslims Repudiate Rhetoric, Worldview of Al-Qaeda (CAIR)

To read about CAIR’s other anti-terror initiatives, go to:
http://www.cair.com/AmericanMuslims/AntiTerrorism.aspx

CAIR, America’s largest Muslim civil liberties group, has 33 offices, chapters and affiliates nationwide and in Canada. Its mission is to enhance the understanding of Islam, encourage dialogue, protect civil liberties, empower American Muslims, and build coalitions that promote justice and mutual understanding.

– END –





On Ramadan and Moon Sighting

9 09 2007

Inevitabley, every year the Muslims (at least those of us in the West) fall into debating and confusion about the beginning of Ramadan.  Thus, I thought it would serve some benefit to post this article on the subject. Insh’Allah it will bring more clarity and is written in a way that is both understandable and backed up with evidence from the Qur’an and Sunnah. Of course, there are different opinions and something tells me individuals will follow whichever one they deem correct.  Nonetheless, I’m posting this here for those who want to get the benefit.

Question: What is the ruling on moon sighting during Ramadan? What about ISNA’s new practice?

To hear the answer, click on this link:

http://www.adly.net/QBoard/index.htm

click zidan then click isna to listen

Also Shaykh Ibrahim has written the following concerning the decision of ISNA. Shaykh Ibrahim Zidan lectures regularly at our website and is also a member of the Assembly of Muslim Jurists in North America.

Why Muslims should look for the Moon and not calculations for calendar.

In recent years before Ramadan, Muslims in different states are in confusion on whether they should go by the Moon sighting or by using astronomical calculations. The reasons for this confusion are many, and that is not the purpose of this article, instead the purpose of this article is to see the clear evidences that using astronomical calculations instead of depending on Moon sightings is a major error that would lead to even things that are worst.

First, we need to agree on some principals:

1-        The sources of Tashree’ legislation in Islam are the Quran, the Sunnah, and Ijmaa’ consensus. These three principals are agreed upon among all Muslim Scholars.

2-        To Say that something is not valid, it has to fulfill three conditions:

a.        It is forbidden in the Shariah.
b.        The Shariah came with the obligation to do what is opposite.
c.        The Shariah didn’t order such a thing when there was the need for it at the time of the Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy wa Sallam.

3-        In matter of disputes and differences of opinions, we have no choice but to return to the Quran and the Sunnah of the Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam.

Allah Says: “ O you who believe, obey Allah and obey the Messenger Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam, and those of you (Muslims) who are in authority. And if you differ in anything amongst yourselves, refer it to Allah and His Messenger, if you believe in Allah and in the Last Day. That is better and suitable for final determination.” (3:59).

Using one’s personal intelligence, opinions or any other thing are not valid when the matter has been decided in the Quran or the Sunnah of the Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam.

4-        The only way Muslims would unite (which is a goal and a hope of every Muslim) is to Follow the Quran and the Sunnah of the Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam, the way it was applied by the companions of the The Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam.

As Muslims, we believe that the companions of the Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam were the best generation ever brought to mankind, and the only way for the later generations to gain the pleasure of Allah is to follow the way of the companions may Allah be pleased with them.

Allah says: “ And the foremost to embrace Islam of the Muhajirun and the Ansar and also those who followed them exactly. Allah is well-pleased with them as they are well-pleased with Him. He has prepared for them Gardens under which rivers flows to dwell therein forever. That is the supreme success.” (9:100)

If we agree on these principals (and we should agree), then it is not appropriate down the line to do opposite to what these principals are stating.

Let’s look at the issue of astronomical calculations.

Since the time of the Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam till now, the way Muslims start and end the month of Ramadan is by sighting the moon. In recent years, some called for using astronomical calculations to determine the beginning of Ramadan, it started by just using the calculations to deny the sighting if it was impossible according to the calculations for the moon to be sighted, but not to be used in determining the beginning or the ending of the month. Then recently, things started to change, and now there is a call to use solely calculations instead of the moon sighting. It is the consensus of the Ulama (scholars) that this is not permissible to use astronomical calculations to determine the beginning or the ending of the Lunar months because of the following reasons:

1.        None of the Hadiths related to the matter ordered or recommended to use calculations, although the need for it was there at the time of the Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam, and the calculation was present at the time.

Some people think that calculation is a scientific phenomenon that was discovered recently, which is a misconception. Calculations were present at the time of the Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam and He still refused to use it and said:

“ We are illiterate nation; we neither write, nor know accounts. The month is like this and this, i.e. sometimes 29 days and sometimes 30” (Bukhari – Book of Saum 1799).

Some say that when the Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam said “ When you see the crescent start fasting, and when you see the crescent (of Shawaal), stop fasting; and if the sky is overcast (and you can’t see it) then Faqdoro lah regard the crescent (month) of Ramdan (as of 30 days)” (Bukhary and others), that the word “Faqdoro lah” (regard the crescent) means you can use calculations. This is false since the Prophet himself explained the meaning of this word by stating to let the month be 30 days. And Allah Says in the Quran:

“O you who believe. Make not a decision in advance before Allah and His Messenger and fear Allah. Verily Allah is All-Hearing, All-knowing” (49:1).

2.        It is clear that the Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam forbade his Ummah from depending on calculations to determine the beginning of the month. This is clear in the Hadith mentioned earlier

“ We are illiterate nation; we neither write, nor know accounts. The month is like this and this, i.e. sometimes 29 days and sometimes 30” (Bukhari – Book of Saum 1799).

The Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam said in the Hadith clearly “la Nahsib” means that we don’t count (in matter related to lunar months) because the Ummah of the Prophet know how to count and some know how to write, so it is not stating a fact but rather directing the Ummah and forbidding them to use calculations for determining the beginning and the ending of the months. And it means that we are an illiterate Ummah with regarding to matter of the religion, the religion is very easy and does not need scientific discoveries and calculations for matters of worship. The illiterate mentioned in the Hadith does not mean that we as Muslims should be illiterate! Off course not, and it doesn’t mean that it is a fact that we are an illiterate Ummah because the facts denies this, but rather it means that we as Muslims should not use scientific means to determine the month since the Hadith is dealing with this subject. Ibn Hajar May Allah have Mercy on him said in explanation of this Hadith: “The Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam made the ruling of fasting depends on the eyesight to make easy for his people since calculation might be difficult for them and the ruling stayed the same even if people after them they knew calculations good, since the context means to forbade calculations all together, and the other Hadith “Faqdoro lah”(regard for the crescent) that he said to make it 30 days and didn’t order the people to use calculations, because that would diminish the differences and disputes among the people”. It shows clearly in his words that it is not permissible to take calculations and leave what the Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam ordered, otherwise it brings disputes among the Muslims.

3.        The Sahriah clearly ordered the opposite of calculations.

The Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam Said: If you see it (The moon) then fast, and if you don’t see it then do not fast” and this is a clear order to do the opposite to what some are calling to use calculations. And if calculation was a mean of determination, the Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam would have ordered or recommended it, since He didn’t leave his Ummah unless he showed them all that is good for them and also what is evil for them. The matter is not something new, but rather it is something that was present at the time of the Prophet and he still ordered to look for the moon and to avoid calculations.

4.        The Hadith that states that we are an illiterate Ummah is in the context of being proud that matters of our worship and things in the religion we do not need scientific discoveries to perfect our worship but rather it is such an easy way of life that even the simple man that doesn’t know much can still follow the religion in the most perfect way.

5.        We as Muslims should have our unique ways because it is forbidden for us to imitate the non Muslims. And you can see that, in the life of the Prophet and also in the Hadith above.

6.        Looking for the moon is part of our religion, it is only the witness of one person that is trustworthy that makes the Muslims starts their month of Fasting. Notice how Allah has made it easy, while in other matters like Zina (fornication) Allah made it very difficult for the witnessing to be taken legally, it has to be by 4 people seeing the exact act itself, which in most cases makes it impossible. Allah is the Most Wise, so we need to see the wisdom of Allah in all of matters of the religion.

7.        The Sayings of the Ulamaa of this Ummah with regarding to the calculations:

a.        It is been reported the Ijmaa’ Consensus among the scholars of the early generations of Islam that determining the beginning of the month using the astronomical calculations is not permissible, this Ijmaa’ was reported by Ibn Taymiah, Ibn Almunthir, Ibn A’bdeen and Ibn Rushd.

b.        Those who said that it is permissible to use calculations, with the differences of whether to use it without conditions or only at certain situations when the skies have overcast, and some said only in denying a claim that the Moon had been sited and not for the determination of the beginning of the month. These Scholars are said to be: Ibn Suraij, Muttarif ibn Ashekheir, Ibn Qutaiba and among the later generations Ibn Assubky. Ibn Suraij reported from Imam Ashafei’ that he mentioned the permissibility of using the calculations at time of overcast.

This last claim the Ulama of the Shafei’ school of thought denied that Imam Ashafei’ said that, as it was said by Ibn Hajar and Ibn Abdel Barr. As we see that there is a mistake in reporting the opinions of those who say that it is permissible. Sheikh Bakr AbuZaid said when wrote about the matter: “What has been reported from Imam Ashafei’ is wrong, Ibn Suraij was wrong in reporting it, so as a result it is wrong to say that Ibn Suraij had that opinion since he based his opinion on the opinion of his Imam “Ashafi’ May Allah have mercy on them. And the rest Assubki and others they built their evidences accordingly, which shows that it is all invalid”. Ibn Taymeiah May Allah have mercy on him said: “If that is true (some Ulama said it is ok to use calculations) then this is from the mistakes of the Ulama”.

Therefore the Consensus is still in place, and it is not permissible to break the consensus among the Ulama of this Umma. And it is not permissible for someone to say: since there is differences in opinions we can choose whatever we like. This is a deviant way with dealing with the text of the Sharia’ because Allah Ta’ala ordered us in times of differences to refer back to Allah and His Messenger and not the differences of opinions.

Allah says” And if you differ in anything amongst yourselves refer it to Allah and His Messenger, if you believe in Allah and in the Last Day. That is better and suitable for final determination.” (3:59).

8.        The calculations only determine without certainty, the time when the new moon is born and not when to be seen. There is big difference between the two. The Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam ordered us to see the moon, and seeing is something different that the moon to be born. The moon can be already born but cannot be seen. So according to calculations, people will start the fast when according to the order of the Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam it is not time yet, because it cannot be seen. Who do we follow: The Messenger of Allah, the one that doesn’t speak from his desire but from revelation, or calculations that are not certain?

9.        If people complain that it is always the uncertainty before Ramadan and before Eid, and people have to plan ahead for vacations and preserving places for the Eid prayer, so it makes it much easier to pre-determine the beginning and the ending of Ramadan. This is all irrelevant, because we as Muslims need to be slaves of Allah the All-Mighty and make our lives subjected to the laws of Allah and not the opposite.

10.        Some people say that when we relied on moon sightings, mistakes happened and people ended up fasting 28 days sometimes and things of that nature, and to respond to that we are not better than the companions May Allah be pleased with them, it happened at their time and there is nothing wrong with that, plus the mistakes with calculations are far more. And the matter is not when exactly the month starts, the matter is obeying the Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam and see the moon to start the month or completed 30 days.

From all the above, we see that the matter has Ijmaa’ Consensus of the companions of the Prophet Salla Allahu Alihy Wa Sallam, the early generations of Islam, the 4 Imams and the majority of the people of knowledge, and our goal should be to follow the truth and not the goal to do what is easier. If that is the case, I think the matter is very clear. It is not permissible to use moon calculations for the determinations or the end of the Blessed month of Ramadan. The cure to the Muslim Ummah of the weakness present is to hold fast to the truth and never compromise it, till Allah changes the situations of the Muslims. Finally, I ask Allah Ta’ala to unite the Muslims on the truth and to dissolve their differences and to guide us all to what pleases Him.

Ibrahim Zidan

www.sunnahfollowers.net